it en

Press Review

02 • 03 • 2020
Wine Enthusiast

If you follow Italian wine, you’ve likely heard the buzz surrounding the just-released 2015 vintage of Brunello di Montalcino, with many pundits claiming it’s one of the best vintages ever. Coming on the heels of the washout 2014 vintage, unsurprisingly, a number of local wine makers have been touting the greatness of 2015 well before its official 2020 release.

Time for a reality check.

With few exceptions, vintages are almost never even across the board in Montalcino. Variations between altitudes, soils and microclimates, as well as producer experience and styles, make such sweeping acclaim almost impossible to apply to Brunello. But in all my years of tasting Brunello, never have I seen a vintage with such an erratic performance like 2015.

An overall hot and dry vintage, there are some drop-dead gorgeous 2015 Brunellos. But there’s also an unprecedented number of high alcohol wines clocking in at 15% alcohol by volume (abv), some even 15.5%, that lack freshness and balance. And while a minority, in between these two extremes are some lean wines with restrained alcohol, but unripe fruit.

Here’s your 2015 Brunello breakdown—the good, the bad and the ugly—to help you make sense of this “buyer beware” vintage.

The Good

The good news is that there are some stunning 2015 Brunellos, like Il Marroneto’s Madonna delle Grazie that earned one of my rare 100-point ratings. Loaded with finesse, it’s vibrant, impeccably balanced and one of the few from the vintage with serious aging potential.

Of the more than 200 wines reviewed, 18 bottlings scored 95 points or higher. Many of my top wines come from high-altitude vineyards that generally perform better in hot, dry vintages. Most hail from the denomination’s standout producers that have years, if not generations, of winemaking experience.

While the classic areas just south and north of the town of Montalcino did well overall, this vintage depended more on what producers did, or didn’t do, in the vineyards as opposed to specific subzones. Even some of the most renowned areas of the denomination had mixed results.

The Bad

The year began with a dry winter that led into a rather dry spring, with temperatures that rose in June.

July was exceptionally hot, as temperatures reached over 40°C (104°F) mid-month and brought drought conditions. August also had little rainfall. Rain fell the first week of September and cooled things down, but temperatures rose again mid-month.

Harvest time is always a major factor. With fickle Sangiovese, when to pick in hot, dry years is pivotal.

“2015 wasn’t as hot as 2003 or 2011, but it was still consistently hot and dry, with intense, constant sunlight during the growing season. Picking at ideal maturation was critical because waiting even just three or four days more led to overripe grapes,” says Lorenzo Magnelli, co-owner/winemaker of the family-run Le Chiuse. “When grapes are overripe, you lose the elegance, precision and freshness of a quintessential Brunello.”

Magnelli, among the first to harvest in his area north of Montalcino, made a standout 2015.

The Ugly

Although some producers are understandably hyping up the 2015 vintage—the polar opposite of cool and wet 2014—it’s not one of the best vintages of all time for Brunello. The number of unbalanced wines with blistering alcohol and cooked fruit shows how Sangiovese suffers in hot, dry vintages, which has become the new normal. And this isn’t a question of personal preference. The majority of these high-octane wines don’t have the fruit and fresh acidity to balance them out. It makes them a chore to consume, and they lack aging potential.

If picking when grapes were overripe resulted in brawny, one-dimensional wines, producers that picked too early ended up with lean wines with raw fruit sensations.

“Sangiovese has difficulty defending itself in hot years,” says enologist Paolo Salvi. “Turning the soil to keep the ground moist, careful canopy management and not defoliating too much to avoid exposing grapes to the sun are crucial.”

Salvi, who tasted for years with the late Sangiovese maestro Giulio Gambelli, collaborates with various Tuscan estates like Le Potazzine in Montalcino.

“I recently tried about a hundred 2015 Brunellos and despite the heat, overall the year was better than I expected, thanks to the commitment of producers,” he says. “So while it ended up a good year, it’s not one to go crazy over.”

Thankfully, despite the challenges, some producers nailed it and made exceptional 2015 Brunellos with juicy fruit, freshness and balance. While some show good aging potential, most of the top wines will need just a few years to come around, but should maintain well for another eight to 10 years.

The Great

The 2016 vintage on the other hand (out in 2021), promises to be a truly outstanding year in Montalcino thanks to near perfect growing conditions for Sangiovese. Barrel tastings show 2016 has the potential for fragrant, structured and focused wines that boast finesse and serious longevity.

My Top 2015 Brunellos

Il Marroneto Madonna delle Grazie (LLS-Winebow) $300, 100 points. Cellar Selection.
Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona Pianrosso (Indigenous Selections) $79, 98 points. Cellar Selection.
Conti Costanti (Empson USA Ltd) $150, 98 points.
Fuligni (Empson USA Ltd) $80, 98 points. Editors’ Choice.
Le Chiuse (Frederick Wildman & Sons) $110, 98 points.
Le Potazzine (Skurnik Wines, Inc.) $100, 97 points.
Armilla (Omniwines Distribution) $70, 96 points. Editors’ Choice.
Castelgiocondo (Shaw-Ross International Importers) $75, 96 points. Editors’ Choice.
Le Ragnaie Casanovina Montosoli (Vine Street Imports) $175, 96 points. Cellar Selection.
Talenti (Wolfpack Worldwide LLC) $50, 96 points. Editors’ Choice.

27 • 02 • 2020
Sky Tg 24

Metti una ventina di giornalisti invitati nell’avveniristica sede Microsoft a Milano, quattro nuove bottiglie di vino e i produttori dello stesso vino, che ne hanno spiegato le caratteristiche, collegati in videoconferenza dalla cantina, a più di 400 kilometri di distanza. È andata in scena, in occasione della settimana del Benvenuto Brunello 2020, la prima degustazione di vino virtuale e interattiva. Protagoniste assolute le nuove annate di Rosso di Montalcino DOC, Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Annata, Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Pianrosso e 385 della storica cantina Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona.

Il progetto

L’iniziativa è nata dalla partnership della cantina toscana con Microsoft e Si-Net ma soprattutto dall’utilizzo della piattaforma di collaborazione Microsoft Teams: si tratta di un software dedicato soprattutto a imprese (sia piccole che medio-grandi) che permette di abbattere l’uso della posta elettronica attraverso strumenti di lavoro virtuali come software per teleconferenze, lavagna interattiva, trascrizione automatica dei meeting, spazio per file condivisi, il tutto collegato con la suite Office 365. E così grazie a Teams è stato possibile effettuare una degustazione in videoconferenza con cinque telecamere collegate: due a Milano, dove erano presenti i giornalisti; tre in Toscana: una inquadrava i proprietari dell’azienda, un’altra la bottaia, una terza lo splendido panorama delle colline senesi.

La degustazione del futuro

L’iniziativa presentata a Milano è stata certamente la prima del suo genere e apre la strada a una serie di degustazioni guidate che, in futuro, grazie a questa tecnologia potranno essere fatte (ad esempio) con acquirenti o distributori collegati dall’altra parte del mondo. Una soluzione, tra l’altro, in grado di risolvere i problemi di lontananza o “isolamento” di tante piccole aziende che fanno l’eccellenza del nostro territorio: il sistema utilizzato, infatti, non ha bisogno di fibra ottica ad altissima velocità ma riesce ad adattarsi senza problemi anche a connessioni più lente. “In Microsoft e Si-Net abbiamo trovato i partner ideali per il nostro percorso d’innovazione e la scalabilità del cloud rappresenta un valido alleato a supporto di una crescita flessibile”, ha spiegato Paolo Bianchini, comproprietario di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona. “Grazie alla semplicità di uno strumento come Teams - ha aggiunto - è possibile ripensare anche esperienze consolidate come le degustazioni e aprire nuove opportunità per un mondo senza confini”. Luba Manolova, direttore della divisione Microsoft 365 di Microsoft Italia, ha aggiunto che la cantina toscana è stata selezionata “tra i casi di trasformazione digitale raccontati all’interno della raccolta di storie di innovazione ‘Ambizione Italia per le PMI’ perché crediamo possa offrire interessanti spunti di formazione e mostrare ad altre aziende del paese l’importanza del digitale a supporto della competitività”.

 
27 • 02 • 2020
The New York Times

Back in 2014, the last time our wine panel tried Rosso di Montalcino, one taster did not restrain himself in criticizing the wines.

“I think Chianti blows these wines away,” said Chris Cannon, a veteran restaurateur and wine expert who is now the managing partner of Jockey Hollow Bar and Kitchen in Morristown, N.J.

I disagreed with him back then, finding a lot to like in the bottles we tasted. But after the wine panel revisited Rosso di Montalcino recently, tasting 20 bottles from the 2016 and 2017 vintages, I have been rethinking my position.

It’s not generally my inclination to make categorical statements like Chris’s. My orientation is almost always to seek out what’s good in a wine, and to be open to the subtleties and gray shadings that are often more accurate representations of reality than blanket, black-and-white judgments.

But I’ve been drinking a lot of Chianti Classicos recently, and have been thinking about the differences between the Chiantis and the Rossos, as well as their points in common.

They are both red wines of Tuscany, and expressions of the sangiovese grape. Maybe the similarities end there.

Chianti is from the hilly region between Florence and Siena. Unlike Rosso di Montalcino and its big brother, Brunello di Montalcino, which must both be 100 percent sangiovese, Chianti needs only to be 80 percent sangiovese.

In the best Chiantis, the remainder is generally made up of local grapes like canaiolo and colorino, or the wine is entirely sangiovese. International grapes like cabernet sauvignon and merlot are permitted, and were once common additions. But their presence, even in small percentages, often stuck out, and their popularity in the region has faded over the last 20 years.

The Montalcino zone is to the southwest of Chianti, and tends to be warmer and drier. The Montalcino wines are often denser and more muscular than the generally leaner and more angular ones made in the cooler Chianti region.

In both areas, wines can range from elegant to powerful, depending on the climate and composition of the soil, particularly its fertility and the presence of clay. But the power in the Montalcino wines tends to be amplified.

 

Brunellos have stringent aging requirements. They must wait at least four years after harvest before they can be released, including at least two years in wood. The category of Rosso di Montalcino was invented to provide cash flow to Brunello producers during this long aging process. Rossos need to be aged only one year after harvest, including six months in barrels.

Rossos also help producers to improve their Brunellos by providing a destination for grapes that they do not want to put into their top wines, either because they are from young vines or for any other reasons.

This is one explanation for the varying quality of Rossos: Some producers regard Rosso as an easy, delicious wine entirely apart from their Brunellos, and create their cuvées to fulfill their vision. Other winemakers use it as a dumping place for grapes or wines that they do not think measure up.

Chianti Classico, like Rosso, must age a year before it can be sold. Other categories, like Chianti Classico Riserva and Gran Selezione, must age for longer periods, though not as long as Brunello di Montalcino. In the end, straightforward Chianti Classico is not a bad comparison point for Rosso di Montalcino.

For this recent Rosso tasting, Florence Fabricant and I were joined by Thera Clark, wine director at the Beatrice Inn in the West Village, and Eliza Christen, beverage director at Lilia and Misi in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

We all shared a general sense of disappointment in the wines. They were inconsistent, which was not unexpected. After all, the 2016 and 2017 vintages were very different. In 2016, the growing season was long and moderate, and many of the wines have been described as fragrant and nuanced, while ’17 was hot and dry, producing wines that were often exuberantly fruity.

Inconsistency might also be attributed to differences in microclimates, altitude and soils, with some of the wines coming from limestone, sandstone and marl, and others coming from clay-rich soils.

More telling than inconsistency, however, we found too many bottles to be unbalanced, dominated either by tannins or acidity or a lack of one or the other. And in quite a few bottles, possible intricacies were overwhelmed by richness, sweetness and power, regardless of the vintage.

Thera said some of the wines felt forced, as if they were trying to be something they were not. She likened them to people squeezing themselves into suits that were too tight.

Eliza said many of the wines were incomplete, lacking the sort of qualities that are at the heart of sangiovese’s appeal, while Florence said they were short in character.

That said, the wines we did like were balanced, combining bittersweet fruit flavors with lively acidity, earthiness and the sort of structure indicating that the wines would be capable of aging for five to 10 years. None had the dusty purity, grace or transparency that I have enjoyed in so many Chianti Classicos, but those are not qualities I’ve often seen in Rosso di Montalcinos.

Still, we did like quite a few of the wines. Our favorite was the 2016 Uccelliera, rich and tannic, with earthy, lingering flavors of sweet and bitter red fruits. Right behind it was the sweet, spicy and floral 2017 Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, which was also our best value at $25.

Interestingly, these producers are neighbors in the Castelnuovo dell’Abate zone in the southeast of Montalcino, one of the region’s warmer areas. The wines are full-bodied but not at all overripe or forced, to use Thera’s term.

Our No. 3 bottle, the lively, pure and structured 2017 Mastrojanni, is also from the southeast.

The 2016 Fonterenza was our No. 4 bottle, but in some ways I think it had the potential to be the best in the tasting. It came from the Sant’Angelo region in the south, but from higher-altitude vineyards, and was quite floral, textured and energetic. It was a bottle that we all felt would improve with additional aging.

The 2017 La Torre, No. 5, was likewise from higher altitude vines in Sant’Angelo, and was clear, floral and lightly tannic. The 2017 Canalicchio di Sopra was from the north of Montalcino, where wines are said to be leaner and more elegant, yet this, our No. 6 bottle, was big and ripe, with sweet flavors of dark fruits.

Of our remaining favorites, the ripe, balanced, structured 2017 Gianni Brunelli, No. 7, came from the central Montalcino zone; the ripe, round, pleasantly bitter 2016 Castello Romitorio, No. 8, came from the northwest; the earthy, floral 2017 Altesino was from the north; and the big, powerful, bright 2017 La Palazetta from Flavio Fanti was from the southeast.

Some of my favorite producers were not in the tasting. I would always recommend bottles from Le Potazzine, Conti Costanti, Il Paradiso di Manfredi, Fattoria dei Barbi, Il Poggione and, if money is no object, Poggio di Sotto, Biondi-Santi and Stella di Campalto.

In the end, despite our mixed feelings about the tasting, I resist disparaging the whole category as Chris Cannon did at our 2014 tasting. I’ve had too many of these wines that I have liked.

Yet Montalcino is simply a different expression of sangiovese than Chianti Classico, and vive la difference. I am not hesitant to bash styles of wine that stray too far into the overblown cocktail world, but Rosso di Montalcino is by no means there. Good examples have their place, without a doubt.

 

Still, the number of unbalanced wines we found was unsettling. It’s hard to believe in a category more than the producers themselves do. If a thing is worth doing, as countless parents have scolded, it’s worth doing well. Right now, with these wines, the potential is there, but value and pleasure are not always delivered.

 

Best Value

★★★½ Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona Rosso di Montalcino 2017 $25

Sweet and spicy floral aromas, with clear, balanced, bittersweet red fruit and mineral flavors. (Indigenous Selections, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)

By Eric Asimov

 

 

26 • 02 • 2020
Beverfood

Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona fa squadra con Microsoft, Si-Net e Gruppo Meregalli e dà il via al primo Digital Wine Tasting. In occasione della settimana del Benvenuto Brunello 2020, la tenuta toscana fa leva sull’innovazione tecnologica per presentare i nuovi Rosso di Montalcino DOC, Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Annata e Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Pianrosso, nonché per rilanciare il 385 nato dalla partnership con Tenuta Fertuna e Gruppo Meregalli.

Grazie alla piattaforma di collaborazione, messaggistica e video-conferencing Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona ha ripensato i propri modelli di produttività e business per inaugurare un nuovo modo di comunicare e interagire con clienti e wine lovers di tutto il mondo. Dalla Microsoft House di Milano, con la partecipazione di Marcello Meregalli, in collegamento diretto con la tenuta di Montalcino è avvenuta la prima degustazione virtuale interattiva, grazie alla quale clienti e operatori del mondo vitivinicolo hanno avuto modo di assaporare le nuove annate 2015.

La famiglia Bianchini, proprietaria della storica azienda produttrice di Brunello, ha guidato la degustazione live dalla cantina toscana mettendo in luce le caratteristiche organolettiche dei nuovi vini, che stanno già riscuotendo grande successo oltre i confini.

Grazie alla tecnologia Microsoft e alla consulenza strategica di Si-Net, Montalcino e Milano non sono mai state così vicine e dopo questa prima sperimentazione, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona punta a replicare l’esperienza anche nel resto del mondo, introducendo il “Digital Wine Tasting” come nuova modalità per ingaggiare clienti attuali e prospect, abbattendo le barriere geografiche e ottimizzando tempi e costi legati alle trasferte.

Quindi grazie all’utilizzo estensivo di Teams sarà più facile raggiungere gli stakeholder in tutto il mondo e agevolare degustazioni e scambi di opinioni sui prodotti. Un’esperienza avanguardistica che dimostra il valore dell’innovazione a supporto della tradizione del Made-in-Italy.

Facendo leva sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona non solo ha potuto abilitare una nuova forma di customer engagement particolarmente in linea con le caratteristiche dei mercati oltreoceano e orientale, ma può beneficiare di un valido supporto alla produttività interna. Una piccola innovazione che se applicata su scala più ampia, può contribuire alla competitività della filiera per merito di dialoghi più agevoli e condivisione di informazioni ovunque e in qualunque momento tra colleghi e operatori del settore, anche in vigna, in cantina e presso fiere enogastronomiche.

25 • 02 • 2020
Il Golosario

Un’ottima annata quella che porta la data del 2015. Ottima in generale ma in particolare per il Brunello di Montalcino che sembra aver trovato una coerenza generale, segno che quando l’uva è sana, il lavoro in cantina è solo un accompagnamento. Vincono dunque l’eleganza e la finezza nel 2015, mentre l’opulenza riscontrata in altre annate è rara, ma questo davvero non sembra un di meno per un millesimo che si fa bere, è immediato, con vini già pronti e godevoli.

2015: eleganza, finezza, prontezza di beva

Personalmente ho ritrovato il mio Brunello, con quelle fini speziature animali in molti campioni, l’intensità del frutto e in molti casi quei tannini perfettamente levigati dentro a un sorso di piacevole pregnanza. Certamente il 2015 sarà un’annata di riserve, che nel 2014 sono state pochissime, per cui rimandiamo al prossimo anno. Le aziende migliori? Tante, sui 143 campioni assaggiati alla cieca. Ora, se la soglia delle eccellenze (dai 4* in su) ha interessato più del 60% dei campioni, tanto per intenderci, l’asticella delle cantine che andiamo a citare in questo articolo necessariamente si alza, per evitare di fare un elenco lunghissimo. Quindi ecco i migliori assaggi, che sono arrivati alla soglia dei 5*, partendo da un gruppo di cantine a noi nuove, rispetto al riconoscimento Top Hundred, che saranno prese in considerazione per il prossimo Golosario 2021.

Brunello di Montalcino 2015: le scoperte

La prima è la Fornacella, che aveva pienezza e mineralità, ma anche una complessità evidente data dalle sue note animali. Un bel campione. Sorpresa inaspettata la lettura del nome La Colombina, per il campione che ha avuto i 5* della perfezione. Bel naso, fine, frutta speziata e un equilibrio in bocca esemplare con tannini ben levigati. Un prototipo davvero tipico di questa annata che conferma la piacevolezza della bevuta. Bene anche il Brunello di Montalcino 2015 de La Fiorita che aveva anche note mandorlate. Una frutta vinosa ha accompagnato l’assaggio de La Magia, mentre la filigrana l’abbiamo trovata nel Paradiso di Cacuci col suo sorso pieno e di carezzevole tannicità.

Bell’equilibrio nel Brunello di Piancornello e una speziatura tipica che vira a sentori animali con il Brunello di Renieri. Sorpresa poi nel leggere il nome di Roberto Cipresso che esce per la prima con un Brunello di Montalcino tutto suo davvero esemplare: sul mio taccuino ho scritto “ha tutto quello che deve avere un Brunello elegante” con il bagaglio di ricchezza che consente questa annata. Ottimo il Brunello dell’azienda San Giacomo, che spicca per la freschezza alla fine di un sorso complesso. Decisamente pieno il Brunello di San Carlo. Nuovo per noi è poi Casisano, una cantina che ci ha fatto conoscere un Brunello con note balsamiche e un finale giustamente tannico di lunga persistenza.

Brunello di Montalcino 2015: le conferme

Bene, ed ora le conferme, che in un’annata così importante sono state tante, per cui le cantine che citiamo, con mia grande soddisfazione, sono quelle che hanno raggiunto il punteggio che sta intorno ai 5*. Iniziamo dal fondo questa volta, per andare al campione 141: Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, bravi! Si impone anche il Castello di Romitorio e l’ottima Carpineto, che in queste anteprime si è sempre distinta, nel Chianti come nel Vino Nobile, ma qui con il Brunello ci ha dato forse il meglio con un bicchiere ricco già al naso, rotondo e pieno.

Felici di annoverare anche quest’anno, fra i top, Caprili e poi un tris di storici come Argiano, Caparzo e Agostina Pieri che spicca per le note fruttate e animali insieme ed è ricco quanto basta per farsi bere con voluttà. Notevole il Brunello di Villa i Cipressi che ci fa pensare a un versante di Montalcino benedetto dalla buona sorte. Via con un altro tris di conferme: Tenuta di Sesta con un Brunello fragrante, la Tenuta la Fuga, esemplare al naso e infine Le Potazzine con quella speziatura delle grandi annate che qui interpretano in maniera magistrale.

Eccoci poi all’affermazione di un nostro amore, che è Ridolfi e di un grande del territorio come Salvioni. Leggere poi il nome di Podere Brizio, nostro top hundred di tanti anni fa, fra i Brunello setosi e balsamici ci ha fatto piacere, a conferma di una storia che prosegue. E ottimo anche il Brunello di Pian delle Vigne che ha profondità ed equilibrio, così come il Brunello di Mastrojanni che è un esemplare di tipicità davvero notevole: note calde animali e tannini finissimi.
Evviva per il Brunello di Lambardi (e che gioia vederlo spiccare, essendo affezionati da tanti anni al suo lavoro) e per quello del Marroneto. Non male Greppone Mazzi e Il Poggione (ma potevano smentirsi questi giganti?) Ampio lo spettro aromatico al naso del Brunello di Fuligni, mentre il campione di Fattoi si è distinto per la sua mineralità. E infine, anche se è stato il primo dei Brunello assaggiati che poi abbiamo voluto riassaggiarlo per avere conferma di quella pienezza immediata è il Brunello di Montalcino 2015 di Col d’Orcia, grande come e più di sempre. Anche il colore non troppo carico è coerente nel presentare la sua bella stoffa. Si può dire, anche se non li dico mai, che la scalarità del sorso che termina con quei tannini precisi mi ha portato a un vino croccante. Evviva il Brunello di Montalcino 2015!

Paolo Massobrio

21 • 02 • 2020
La Nazione
21 • 02 • 2020
Il Sole 24 Ore

I diretti interessati l'hanno battezzata “Digital Wine Tasting” e in effetti la sperimentazione condotta a quattro mani dalla cantina vinicola Ciacci Piccolomini D'Aragona e Microsoft (con l'ausilio del system integrator Si-Net) è un'esperienza enogastronomica che sfrutta in modo importante le tecnologie. L'idea della storica azienda di Montalcino, le cui origini risalgono al secolo XVII, era quella di interagire con gli amanti e gli appassionati del vino di tutto il mondo in una forma diversa e più innovativa rispetto alla classica visita in tenuta: da qui lo sviluppo di una soluzione di degustazione virtuale “live” grazie alla quale clienti e operatori del settore vitivinicolo hanno avuto modo di “assaporare” da remoto, dalla Microsoft House di Milan,o le nuove produzioni 2015 (Rosso di Montalcino Doc, Brunello di Montalcino Docg Annata e Brunello di Montalcino Docg Pianrosso) sfruttando la piattaforma di collaborazione, messaggistica e video-conferenza Teams del colosso di Redmond.

 

Un modello replicabile e da esportazione

A fare da gran cerimonieri all'evento sono intervenuti i rappresentanti della famiglia Bianchini, proprietaria della storica cantina toscana, e proprio da loro è arrivata conferma che l'esperimento sarà replicato anche nel resto del mondo, con l'idea di farne diventare una sorta e che il “Digital Wine Tasting” sarà eletto a nuova modalità per comunicare con clienti e prospect, eliminando qualsiasi barriera geografica e ottimizzando tempi e i costi legati alle trasferte. Il mercato estero, del resto, è la primaria fonte di entrate per l'azienda (circa l'80% del fatturato totale, e il 30% proviene dagli Stati Uniti) e con il ricorso estensivo alla piattaforma di Microsoft (che vanta oltre 20 milioni di utenti attivi su base giornalieri e più di mezzo milione di imprese che ne fanno uso) l'intento è per l'appunto quello di raggiungere nuovi clienti su scala globale e di agevolare degustazioni e scambi di opinioni e informazioni sui prodotti. Ovunque e in qualunque momento, anche in vigna, in cantina e presso le fiere di settore.

 

Un progetto più ampio che vola nella nuvola

L'adozione di Teams da parte di Ciacci Piccolomini D'Aragona, come hanno spiegato i portavoce di Microsoft, fa inoltre parte di un più ampio percorso di trasformazione digitale che ruota intorno alle soluzioni di cloud computing dell'azienda americana e in particolare all'implementazione della suite di produttività Office 365. Tutte le attività, dalle prenotazioni alle visite dei clienti alla cantina fino alla fatturazione, sono gestite online nella nuvola senza interruzioni, anche in mobilità.

21 • 02 • 2020
Tom's Hardware

Microsoft, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona e Si-Net per il primo Digital Wine Tasting. In occasione della settimana del Benvenuto Brunello 2020, la storica cantina toscana fa leva sull’innovazione tecnologica per presentare i nuovi Rosso di Montalcino DOC, Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Annata e Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Pianrosso.

Grazie alla piattaforma di collaborazione, messaggistica e video-conferencing Microsoft Teams e alla partnership tra Microsoft e Si-Net, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona ha ripensato i propri modelli di produttività e business per inaugurare un nuovo modo di comunicare e interagire con clienti e wine lovers di tutto il mondo.

Una degustazione live dalla cantina toscana che mette in luce le caratteristiche organolettiche dei nuovi vini, tramite la tecnologia Microsoft e alla consulenza strategica di Si-Net. Il Digital Wine Tasting si pone dunque come nuova modalità per ingaggiare clienti attuali e prospect, abbattendo le barriere geografiche e ottimizzando tempi e costi legati alle trasferte.

Ed è proprio l’estero la fonte dell’80% del fatturato dell’azienda vitivinicola, di cui il 30% proviene dal mercato statunitense. Dunque, grazie all’utilizzo estensivo di Teams sarà più facile raggiungere gli stakeholder in tutto il mondo e agevolare degustazioni e scambi di opinioni sui prodotti.

Il progetto ha preso forma grazie alla stretta collaborazione tra Microsoft e Si-Net, che dimostra il costante impegno di Microsoft per promuovere l’innovazione delle PMI italiane attraverso un ecosistema di oltre 10 mila partner sul territorio.

Una piccola innovazione che se applicata su scala più ampia, può contribuire alla competitività della filiera per merito di dialoghi più agevoli e condivisione di informazioni ovunque e in qualunque momento tra colleghi e operatori del settore, anche in vigna, in cantina e presso fiere enogastronomiche.

«In Microsoft e Si-Net abbiamo trovato i partner ideali per il nostro percorso d’innovazione e la scalabilità del cloud rappresenta un valido alleato a supporto di una crescita flessibile. In un mercato in cui il contatto diretto tra le persone è l’elemento essenziale per la compravendita, il Cloud Computing ci aiuta a essere pronti e reattivi, a gestire meglio informazioni e documenti» ha detto Paolo Bianchini, Comproprietario di Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona.

«Nel nostro impegno per guidare le PMI verso la trasformazione digitale gioca un ruolo chiave l’ecosistema di Partner, che vanta una presenza capillare sul territorio ed expertise qualificate in risposta alle esigenze di diversi settori verticali» è stato il commento di Luba Manolova, Direttore della divisione Microsoft 365 di Microsoft Italia.

20 • 02 • 2020
Wine News

Tradizione ed innovazione, un binomio, o meglio un mantra, che risuona nello storytelling del vino da anni, spesso denso di significato, altre volte meno, ma sono comunque le coordinate su cui si muovono, necessariamente, le cantine del Belpaese. La tecnologia, del resto, è stata fondamentale nella crescita qualitativa di interi territori, messa al servizio sia del lavoro tra i filari che, ancor di più, di quello in cantina, a patto di non perdere il contatto con il sapere costruito nei secoli e che ha reso grandi vini come il Brunello di Montalcino. Dove, non a caso, l’innovazione diventa tecnologica, facendo un salto evolutivo potenzialmente epocale, questa volta non a livello produttivo, ma comunicativo e commerciale, frontiera sempre più importante per le sorti del mondo enoico. Così, dall’incontro tra Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, una delle griffe di riferimento del Brunello di Montalcino, e Microsoft, big dell’informatica, l’esperienza enogastronomica si rinnova e la degustazione diventa virtuale ed interattiva. Tutto passa per Microsoft Teams, piattaforma di collaborazione, messaggistica e video-conferencing capace di mettere in scena una vera e propria “Digital Wine Tasting”, un modo per comunicare e interagire con clienti e wine lovers di tutto il mondo restando in azienda: una piccola innovazione che, se applicata su scala più ampia, può contribuire alla competitività della filiera attraverso dialoghi più agevoli e condivisione di informazioni ovunque e in qualunque momento, tra colleghi e operatori del settore, anche in vigna, in cantina e dalle fiere enogastronomiche.

A far “incontrare” due realtà apparentemente tanto distanti come Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona e Microsoft, Si-Net, azienda informatica che offre sistemi integrati per le imprese e gli studi professionali, con cui “abbiamo avviato una vera e propria trasformazione digitale in azienda - spiega, a WineNews, Alex Bianchini, alla guida di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, al fianco del padre Paolo - e con l’ausilio di Teams cerchiamo di integrare l’uso di nuove tecnologie che ci permettano, oltre che di lavorare in mobilità condividendo documenti e file in maniera dinamica, di guidare una vera e propria degustazione”. La prima, in collegamento da una delle tante sale degustazione della griffe del Brunello con il loft Microsoft di Milano, ha portato nei calici le nuove annate di Rosso, Brunello di Montalcino ed il “365”, nato dalla collaborazione con il Gruppo Meregalli, distributore esclusivo per Italia, Francia e Svizzera delle etichette di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona. “Un digital wine tasting - riprende Alex Bianchini - che permette di essere collegati con qualsiasi utente in Italia o nel mondo. Il nostro progetto è quello di adottate questo tipo di sistema per coinvolgere clienti e fornitori, in più Paesi, vivendo però l’esperienza di una vera degustazione. La tecnologia, in questo senso, può essere di grande beneficio per il business del vino, riducendo i viaggi e risparmiando tempo. Il primo step è quello di operare commercialmente con questa nuova piattaforma - conclude Alex Bianchini - ma è un’esperienza che possiamo pensare di condividere anche con i wine lovers”.

Ma cosa può fare, per le piccole e medie imprese del vino, Teams? Lo abbiamo chiesto a Sofia D’Esposito, responsabile Comunicazione e Marketing di Si-Net, “regista” dell’incontro. “Quello che può fare Teams - spiega Sofia D’Esposito a WineNews - per una qualsiasi impresa, a partire da Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, è incredibile: è uno strumento che permette di condividere, collaborare e comunicare in modi innovativi, e soprattutto di avvicinare le persone ovunque si trovino nel mondo. Si possono fare degustazioni virtuali a distanza e comunicare in tanti modi diversi, dalla chat (che offre la possibilità di tradurre in simultanea i contenuti in più di 40 lingue diverse, ndr) alla collaborazione a più mani su documenti e lavori senza alcun tipo di problema o limite. Specie per chi lavora in mobilità, è uno strumento decisamente utile, che aiuta a velocizzare e semplificare il proprio compito”.

“Siamo orgogliosi di collaborare con un’eccellenza del Made-in-Italy come Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona e di sostenerne il percorso di crescita grazie al Cloud Computing. Un’esperienza che dimostra il valore delle nuove tecnologie a supporto delle PMI italiane. Siamo sicuri che, attraverso la piattaforma di collaborazione Teams, questa nuova forma di degustazione digitale potrà dare ulteriore slancio al comparto del Brunello. Per questo abbiamo anche selezionato la cantina toscana tra i casi di trasformazione digitale raccontati all’interno della raccolta di storie di innovazione ‘Ambizione Italia per le PMI’, perché crediamo possa offrire interessanti spunti di formazione e mostrare ad altre aziende del Paese l’importanza del digitale a supporto della competitività. Nel nostro impegno per guidare le PMI verso la trasformazione digitale gioca un ruolo chiave il nostro ecosistema di Partner, che vanta una presenza capillare sul territorio ed expertise qualificate in risposta alle esigenze di diversi settori verticali. La collaborazione tra Microsoft e Si-Net è un esempio emblematico di questa visione, grazie a cui ha potuto prendere vita un progetto semplice ma avanguardistico, che siamo sicuri potrà contribuire alla competitività del territorio”, ha commentato Luba Manolova, Direttore della Divisione Microsoft 365 di Microsoft Italia

19 • 02 • 2020
La Stampa

La storica cantina di Montalcino lancia la degustazione virtuale interattiva, per raggiungere più facilmente clienti e cultori del vino continuare a crescere oltre i confini

Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona fa squadra con Microsoft e Si-Net e dà il via al primo Digital Wine Tasting. In occasione della settimana del Benvenuto Brunello 2020, la storica cantina toscana fa leva sull’innovazione tecnologica per presentare i nuovi Rosso di Montalcino DOC, Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Annata e Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Pianrosso, nonché per rilanciare il 385, nato dalla partnership con Tenuta Fertuna e la famiglia Meregalli. Grazie alla piattaforma di collaborazione, messaggistica e video-conferencing Microsoft Teams e alla partnership tra Microsoft e Si-Net, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona ha ripensato i propri modelli di produttività e business per inaugurare un nuovo modo di comunicare e interagire con clienti e appassionati di tutto il mondo.

Dopo una prima sperimentazione a Milano, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona punta a replicare l’esperienza anche nel resto del mondo, introducendo il Digital Wine Tasting come nuova modalità per ingaggiare clienti attuali e futuri, abbattendo le barriere geografiche e ottimizzando tempi e costi legati alle trasferte. È proprio l’estero la fonte dell’80% del fatturato dell’azienda vitivinicola e, della quota extra Italia, il 30% proviene dal mercato statunitense, quindi grazie all’utilizzo estensivo di Teams sarà più facile raggiungere gli stakeholder in tutto il mondo e agevolare degustazioni e scambi di opinioni sui prodotti. 

Il progetto ha preso forma grazie alla stretta collaborazione tra Microsoft e Si-Net, che dimostra il costante impegno di Microsoft per promuovere l’innovazione delle PMI italiane attraverso un ecosistema di oltre 10.000 partner sul territorio. In particolare, facendo leva sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams, Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona non solo ha potuto abilitare una nuova forma dicoinvolgimento del cliente particolarmente in linea con le caratteristiche dei mercati oltreoceano e orientale, ma può beneficiare di un valido supporto alla produttività interna. Una piccola innovazione che se applicata su scala più ampia, può contribuire alla competitività della filiera per merito di dialoghi più agevoli e condivisione di informazioni ovunque e in qualunque momento tra colleghi e operatori del settore, anche in vigna, in cantina e presso fiere enogastronomiche. Teams è un valido alleato a supporto del business e per questo sta riscuotendo sempre più successo in Italia oltre che a livello globale, dove è presente in 181 mercati in 48 lingue, vantando oltre 20 milioni di utenti attivi al giorno e più di 500.000 organizzazioni che ne fanno uso.

L’adozione di Teams da parte di Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona fa parte di un più ampio percorso di trasformazione digitale che ruota intorno al Cloud Computing di Microsoft e in particolare all’implementazione della piattaforma di produttività Office 365, ancora una volta grazie al supporto strategico del partner Si-Net. Un investimento in innovazione che ha consentito all’azienda di potenziare la produttività individuale e innovare le modalità di collaborazione dei dipendenti, consentendo loro di lavorare al meglio, senza interruzioni, anche in mobilità, gestendo in cloud le proprie attività, dalle prenotazioni alle visite, dalla cantina alle fatturazioni.

Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona è una delle realtà protagoniste del progetto di Microsoft “Ambizione Italia per le PMI: storie di innovazione digitale e Made-in-Italy”, il nuovo eBook sviluppato in collaborazione con l’ecosistema di partner con l’obiettivo di condividere buone pratiche per promuovere la cultura digitale e contribuire all’innovazione e alla crescita delle piccole e medie imprese italiane.

“In Microsoft e Si-Net abbiamo trovato i partner ideali per il nostro percorso d’innovazione e la scalabilità del cloud rappresenta un valido alleato a supporto di una crescita flessibile. In un mercato in cui il contatto diretto tra le persone è l’elemento essenziale per la compravendita, il Cloud Computing ci aiuta a essere pronti e reattivi, a gestire meglio informazioni e documenti e soprattutto a collaborare in tempo reale, sia internamente che con partner, clienti e fornitori. Non solo, grazie alla semplicità di uno strumento come Microsoft Teams, che facilita la comunicazione e abilita nuove modalità di interazione e video-streaming, è possibile ripensare anche esperienze consolidate come le degustazioni e aprire nuove opportunità per un mondo realmente senza confini. Siamo fieri di lanciare il Digital Wine Tasting, che ci auguriamo possa diventare un nuovo standard, non solo per noi, ma per l’intero comparto, affinché il gusto del Brunello di Montalcino possa imporsi sempre più in Italia e all’estero, nel rispetto di efficienza e sostenibilità”, ha dichiarato Paolo Bianchini, comproprietario di Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona.

“Siamo orgogliosi di collaborare con un’eccellenza del Made-in-Italy come Ciacci Piccolomini D’Aragona e di sostenerne il percorso di crescita grazie al Cloud Computing. Un’esperienza che dimostra il valore delle nuove tecnologie a supporto delle PMI italiane. Siamo sicuri che, attraverso la piattaforma di collaborazione Teams, questa nuova forma di degustazione digitale potrà dare ulteriore slancio al comparto del Brunello. Per questo abbiamo anche selezionato la cantina toscana tra i casi di trasformazione digitale raccontati all’interno della raccolta di storie di innovazione ‘Ambizione Italia per le PMI’, perché crediamo possa offrire interessanti spunti di formazione e mostrare ad altre aziende del Paese l’importanza del digitale a supporto della competitività. Nel nostro impegno per guidare le PMI verso la trasformazione digitale gioca un ruolo chiave il nostro ecosistema di Partner, che vanta una presenza capillare sul territorio ed expertise qualificate in risposta alle esigenze di diversi settori verticali. La collaborazione tra Microsoft e Si-Net è un esempio emblematico di questa visione, grazie a cui ha potuto prendere vita un progetto semplice ma avanguardistico, che siamo sicuri potrà contribuire alla competitività del territorio”, ha commentato Luba Manolova, Direttore della divisione Microsoft 365 di Microsoft Italia.

“Fondamentale per il successo di questo progetto è stata la consolidata collaborazione con Microsoft e la possibilità di far leva su una piattaforma cloud affidabile e sicura. A partire da un’analisi delle esigenze di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona abbiamo proposto di abbandonare il sistema on premise, che rendeva l’azienda ‘un’isola’ con la quale era possibile interagire unicamente face-to-face, per passare al Cloud Computing, sfruttando tutte le sue potenzialità. Il progetto di adozione della piattaforma per la produttività Office 365 ha già offerto importanti benefici e un interessante esempio è rappresentato proprio da questa nuova frontiera della customer experience: grazie agli strumenti di messaggistica e video-conferencing di Teams prende il via un nuovo modello d’interazione con i clienti e gli appassionati di vino, che siamo sicuri impatterà sull’efficienza e sulla competitività della cantina”, ha aggiunto Fausto Turco, CEO di Si-Net.  

17 • 02 • 2020
The Buyer

The Tuscan estate of Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona is producing some of the most renowned Brunello and Rosso di Montalcino wines, along with a number of other wines using international varieties. Its top Brunello from the 2015 vintage has just been awarded 100 points by James Suckling and well it might – it’s a beauty. At its UK launch winemaker Paolo Bianchini showed off all of his new wines to a select group of wine buyers, alongside those of another classic Brunello vintage, 2010, as well as divulge the incredible-but-true story of how his family came to own this historic estate.

 

“When (my father) Giuseppe discovered about the heritage of the estate he was alone so he called the entire family together and told them ‘let’s see you all at home’ and when he came he was quite strange… his expression was not something easy to understand,” recalls Paolo.

It’s the thing of movie scripts. The cast includes a hard-working farmer, a rich countess, a bishop’s palace dating back to the Seventeenth Century, 220 hectares of rolling Tuscan hills and farmland, and some of the world’s best wine. If the film was made in Italian it would have been directed by Luchino Visconti with the part of farmer Giuseppe Bianchini played by Burt Lancaster or Robert De Niro with the countess Elda Ciacci played by none other than Sophia Loren. The film would involve quite a few sunset scenes, naturally, cinematographer Vittorio Storaro capturing perfectly the purple hue as it dances off the plump bunches of Sangiovese that will be used to make the estate’s top Brunello di Montalcino. But Ciacci is a real-life character, a countess who in the early Twentieth Century married count Alberto Piccolomini d’Aragona a direct descendant of Pope Pious II and lived in the palace which then became known as the Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona palace. Giuseppe Bianchini was the farmer of the estate who managed the vines, olive trees and the rest of the 220 hectares of this stunning Tuscan property. For years he worked tirelessly keeping the estate running like clockwork, even after the count died.

But then on a sad day in 1985, the countess herself died – an event that could have seen Giuseppe say ‘arrivederci’ to his life’s work and seek gainful employment elsewhere. Except for one small detail. Elda gave the entire estate, all 220 hectares of it, a palace with historic cellars, vines, trees, everything to Giuseppe – lock stock and barrel – as a gift. Giuseppe’s son Paolo Bianchini, sitting in the bar of It the new, on-trend Mayfair Italian restaurant recalls the day.

“When Giuseppe discovered about the heritage he was alone so he called the entire family together and told them ‘let’s see you all at home’ and when he came he was quite strange his expression was not something easy to understand and then he started to cry… he explained everything to the family and he said that the last words that were written by the Countess were ‘I am sure that by doing this my name will be famous all over the world, because Giuseppe knows exactly what I want and he has the philosophy to produce a great quality winery’. ”In the (yet to be made) movie version of this story the Ennio Morricone score would build to a crescendo.

 

Maintaining the legacy

Since that day Giuseppe and now his two children Paolo and Lucia Bianchini have done just that – turning the estate into one of the top producers in Montalcino, planting new vines, introducing a Brunello in 1990, increasing production, introducing new varietals, building a state-of-the-art winery and new cellar – and raising the quality threshold across the board. Although the palace has cellars dating back centuries, wine historically was only made for personal consumption and to give to those working on the estate. Today Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona produces 74,000 bottles of Brunello di Montalcino DOCG from the youngest Sangiovese vines and then, in the best vintages, 37,000 bottles of Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Pianrosso from the oldest vines grown on a 12 ha vineyard that has the best terroir. Both wines are aged in large format Slovenian oak, the Pianrosso for one year extra than the straight Brunello, with eight months in bottle. In perfect vintages the estate produces a Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Riserva Santa Caterina d’Oro which is aged in smaller format Solvenian oak, aged for 36 months and then has a year in bottle. This has only been produced in 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012 and 2015 vintages. Given that critic James Suckling gave 100 points to the latest vintage of Brunello di Montalcino DOCG Pianrosso 2015, one can only wonder what he will give the Santa Caterina d’Oro when it comes out next year. Presumably his palate will ‘go to 11’!

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona also makes two earlier-drinking Rosso di Montalcino DOC, 68,000 bottles of the Rosso and 10,000 of the Rossofonte which has more rigorous selection and gets released 12 months after the Rosso. It also produces a 100% Syrah (one of the first estates in Montalcino to do so) called Fabivs, and a Cabernet Sauvignon/ Merlot blend called Ateo (8,000 bottles of the former and 25-27,000 bottles of the latter). Both these wines are made under the ‘umbrella’ DOC of Sant’Antimo that allows these grape varieties where Montalcino only allows Sangiovese by law. And, the estate produces its own olive oil, grappa and is highly active in oeno-tourism. Apart from upgrading the winemaking and expanding production, Paolo and Lucia have increased penetration into overseas markets. 70% of all the wine made is exported with the US accounting for 40%, Germany, the UK and Sweden being other key markets. And so down to tasting the new vintages

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, Rosso Di Montalcino Rossofonte 2015. This field selection from a three hectare parcel of Sangiovese Grosso, spending one year in 7.5-20 hl Slovenian oak and then eight months in bottle is great value (£26 retail). In the glass it is see-through ruby, with complex aromas of ripe cherries, liquorice, pipe tobacco; the mouthfeel is deceptive – at first rounded, lovely ripe tannins and then a little grip on the finish.

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, Brunello Di Montalcino 2015. Mid-deep ruby; lifted aromas of black fruits, liquorice, potpourri; the palate is so smooth and voluptuous, fruity, slightly spicy, the ripe tannins and acidity are so well integrated, terrific balance and (discreet but present) structure. The finish is very long with a little lick of blood orange, more so than on the other Brunellos. This is a new release or, as Paolo described it “My new son…growing up.”

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, Brunello Di Montalcino 2010. Russet edges/ bricking; secondary character on nose and palate, woody aromas, touch of incense, mulberry; the palate is evolved and deliciously smooth. Complex flavours of ripe red and black fruits, soy, blood orange twist, Rumptopf cherries. Completely ready to drink, well evolved but could easily keep for another decade.

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, Brunello Di Montalcino Pianrosso 2015. Only made in the very best vintages, this is a very special single vineyard Brunello di Montalcino from Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona and is a noticeable step up from the Brunello. Deep ruby-russet in colour; intoxicating aromas of ripe strawberries, dried cherries, liquorice, hint of black cardamom; medium to full bodied, fresh bramble fruit, wild herb, rounded mouthfeel with just enough hit of sandpaper tannins in the finish. Delicious. Awarded 100 points by James Suckling.

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, Brunello Di Montalcino Pianrosso 2010. Sensational. The class of this cuvée is really shining through here and the wine feels much less evolved than the Brunello Di Montalcino 2010 – this is still in its primary drinking window I’d say. Deep ruby; complex aromas of blackberry, dried rosemary, balsamic, touch of sweet tobacco, sandalwood; terrific depth of flavours – rich, black fruit, tar, prune, cake spice. Great balance, and firm structure holding it all together. Still evolving for at least another decade.

The wines of Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona are imported and sold in the UK by Mentzendorff.

By Peter Dean

 

 

17 • 02 • 2020
Montalcino news

Favorita da condizioni meteo poco invernali e da un sole piacevole, la quarta edizione della Brunello Crossing è andata in archivio con un bello spettacolo di sport e amicizia. Il territorio di Montalcino per l’intero weekend ha messo in vetrina tutte le sue eccellenze (enogastronomiche, paesaggistiche…) di cui è ricco davanti ad una platea di 18 nazionalità arrivate specificamente per partecipare all’evento. Una manifestazione, la Brunello Crossing, che si dimostra in salute con potenzialità importanti per il futuro. Questi, invece, i vincitori maschili e femminili della Brunello Crossing, suddivisi per categorie:

Trofeo Banfi (45 km):1. Riccardo Montani (3:31:16) 2. Gabriele Fior (3:43:26) 3. Cristian Camanini (3:47:15).1. Maria Elisabetta Lastri (4:36:03) 2. Elisabetta Luchese (4:48:26) 3. Melissa Paganelli (4:54:43).

Trofeo Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona (24 km):1. Gabriele Pace (1:46:10) 2. Matteo Anselmi (1:54:23) 3. Daniele Donna (1:55:50).1. Annalaura Mugno (2:09:21) 2. Ginevra Cusseau (2:13:11) 3. Monica Baldini ( 2:29:21).

Trofeo Barbi (14 km):1. Gabriele Bacchion (0:55:57) 2. Fabio Salotti (1:04:40) 3. Cristiano Fois (1:08:20).1. Pina Deiana (1:09:55) 2. Cristina Gamberi (1:18:57) 3. Valeria Di Francesco (1:22:41).

In foto, Gabriele Pace.

 

15 • 02 • 2020
Montalcino news

Una degustazione digitale di Brunello con Microsoft. È l’idea innovativa di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, che il 18 febbraio presenterà le nuove annate in collegamento video con Milano, sede di Microsoft Italia, dove un gruppo di 16 persone composto da sommelier, giornalisti e dipendenti del colosso di Bill Gates parteciperanno alla degustazione dei tre vini dell’azienda guidata da Paolo e Lucia Bianchini (Brunello 2015, Brunello Vigna di Pianrosso 2015 e Rosso di Montalcino 2018) più 385, il vino creato a quattro mani con il Gruppo Meregalli, blend di Sangiovese, Merlot, Ciliegiolo e Syrah, che prende il nome dai metri sopra il livello del mare dove ha sede Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, a Castelnuovo dell’Abate. Nel corso dell’incontro sono previsti anche un commento di un esperto Microsoft su Teams, la piattaforma di comunicazione che permetterà il collegamento video, e un discorso di Meregalli sul come la tecnologia possa aiutare il settore vitivinicolo. Un esempio arriva proprio dalla degustazione digitale, che permette di risparmiare tempo e denaro.

 

13 • 01 • 2020
Montalcino news

Il portale specializzato in fine wine Wine-Lister ha stilato una lista dei “Must Buy”, i vini nati 10 anni fa che vale davvero la pena di portare in cantina per qualità, potenziale di invecchiamento e rivalutazione economica. Nella classifica, in ordine decrescente, troviamo il Brunello di Montalcino della Tenuta Greppo di Biondi Santi, il Brunello di Montalcino Sugarille di Pieve Santa Restituta (Gaja), il Brunello di Montalcino di Conti Costanti, il Brunello di Montalcino Vigna di Pianrosso di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona, il Brunello di Montalcino Riserva di Capanna, il Brunello di Montalcino di Mastrojanni, il Brunello di Montalcino di Sesti, il Brunello di Montalcino Montosoli di Altesino e il Brunello di Montalcino di Cupano. Tutti, ovviamente, dell’annata 2010.

10 • 01 • 2020
Montalcino news

Febbraio è il mese in cui Montalcino si “risveglia”. Tante gente arriverà in occasione di Benvenuto Brunello, uno degli appuntamenti simbolo del mondo del vino. Ma una settimana prima i riflettori saranno tutti sulla Brunello Crossing (15 e 16 febbraio) che ormai è pronta a celebrare la sua quarta edizione. Il format è ormai collaudato, con le tre distanze competitive di 45 km (Trofeo Banfi), 24 km (Trofeo Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona) e 14 km (Trofeo Barbi), tutte con partenza e arrivo da Piazza del Popolo e che attraverseranno la Valdorcia, le zone simbolo del Brunello e piccoli ma incantevoli borghi come Castelnuovo dell’Abate e Sant’Angelo in Colle. La non competitiva è la “Walk & Nordic Walking” di 13 km con partenza da Torrenieri (ci sarà un servizio navetta per il collegamento con Montalcino) e “un assaggio” anche di Via Francigena. Tre soste intermedie presso le cantine di Siro Pacenti, Canalicchio di Sopra, Franco Pacenti - Canalicchio che offriranno un assaggio a base di prodotti locali e Rosso di Montalcino. Il weekend sarà anche un’opportunità per visitare cantine, conoscere e degustare lo zafferano e imparare a fare la pasta a mano con delle “maestre” d’eccezione come le massaie montalcinesi! “Per adesso siamo a circa 750 iscritti - commenta Alessio Strada, organizzatore dell’evento - con un +15/20% rispetto allo scorso anno. Ci si potrà iscrivere fino alla settimana prima dello start, anche se probabilmente per la passeggiata le iscrizioni termineranno prima considerando le tante richieste in arrivo”.

02 • 01 • 2020
Montalcino news

C’è anche il Brunello di Montalcino Pianrosso Riserva Santa Caterina d’Oro 2012 di Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona tra i migliori assaggi del 2019 di Gazzagolosa, la rubrica de La Gazzetta dello Sport dedicata all’enogastronomia. “Lo zenit della produzione di Ciacci Piccolomini, la cantina che Paolo Bianchini ha fatto crescere con passione e competenza. Uno dei grandissimi rossi italiani”, scrive il vicedirettore della “rosea” Pier Bergonzi nell’edizione del 27 dicembre.

01 • 01 • 2020
Wine Critic

Siamo pronti a vedere qualcosa di straordinario nella bellezza e nella qualità dei Brunello di Montalcino 2015 e aspettiamo con ansia la loro uscita sul mercato. Ogni vino prodotto supera gli standard qualitativi a cui siamo stati abituati finora principalmente per la qualità organolettica e sensoriale delle uve e l’impostazione dolce e soffice nelle estrazioni da parte dei produttori in cantina.

Lentamente si è andati verso una direzione di piacevolezza importante sin da subito con vini che esprimono la propria essenza unicamente nella qualità del frutto, nel ritorno aromatico nell’ “aftertasting” e ovviamente nell’equilibrio acido-tannico.

I vini rossi si differenziano principalmente dai vini bianchi per essere tridimensionali ed avere nella propria struttura 3 componenti: Acida, Dolce e Tannica (Solo acida e dolce per i vini bianchi).

I tannini sono fondamentali per donare potenza nella struttura e formano insieme agli antociani e numerosi altri composti la vera ricchezza dei vini rossi.

Spesso parliamo molto di tannini nei vini rossi perchè è proprio dalla loro struttura che si può intuire la grandezza e la qualità di una grande annata, ed i tannini dei Brunello di Montalcino 2015 tendono alla perfezione.

Perfettamente maturi e di natura vellutata, i tannini del Sangiovese più famoso d’Italia mostrano nell’annata 2015, concentrazione, compattezza e solida e brillante qualità. Accarezzano dolcemente il palato e sono completamente fusi nella matrice del vino creando un perfetto equilibrio insieme alla componente Acida e Dolce. Questo è stato possibile grazie all’andamento stagionale che ha generato vini equilibrati in tutte le componenti. Gli inverni poco piovosi e non molto rigidi nelle temperature basse hanno lasciato spazio lentamente ad una primavera equilibrata ed in media stagionale con le temperature di 22-24 gradi Celsius. Pochi i fenomeni di escursione termica registrati in primavera. Il mese di luglio è stato molto caldo e ha visto toccare e superare i 40 gradi nella parte centrale del mese anticipando e portando avanti la maturazione delle uve e l’invaiatura di circa 10 giorni. La pioggia di fine luglio ha ristabilito l’equilibrio e aperto la strada ad un agosto caldo ma con importanti escursioni termiche, fondamentali per la concentrazione degli aromi e nel garantire una buona acidità nelle uve. Le piogge di inizio settembre hanno donato nuovamente equilibrio nel complesso e permesso ai produttori di aspettare la maturità fenologica senza problemi. Fondamentali le due settimane dopo il 5 Settembre fino a fine mese dove sono state registrate temperature prossime ai 33 gradi completando del tutto la maturazione delle uve su tutti e 4 i versanti di Montalcino. D’importante rilevanza il fenomeno piovoso del 10 Ottobre con 30 mm di pioggia, ma a quel punto la maggior parte dei produttori avevano già vendemmiato.

Il Brunello di Montalcino 2015 brilla nella qualità e mostra precisione e maestria d’esecuzione in numerosi produttori sin da subito, sarà l’affinamento in bottiglia a completare l’opera. I grandi vini che troveremo al più presto nelle migliori enoteche italiane non sono solo frutto della straordinaria annata…

Per produrre un grande vino, c’è bisogno di grande “terroir” e grandi “Vignerons” o meglio tradotto all’italiana Grandi Territori e Grandi Vignaioli, e Montalcino anno dopo anno si conferma un leader nel settore portando l’eccellenza Toscana ed Italiana nel mondo.

A Gennaio 2020 saranno rilasciati sul mercato i Brunello di Montalcino 2015 e noi siamo già eccitati per assaggiarli e conservarli in cantina, e tu?

 

I miei punteggi

Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona           Brunello di Montalcino          Pianrosso        2015    99/100

Preciso al naso e dal carattere esuberante mostra mille sfumature di rosso nel calice e sentori di prugne nere, cassis, foglia di mirto, radice di ginseng e bergamotto. Si esalta e completa grazie ai sentori di petali di rosa appassita e rosa canina. Corpo pieno, tannini setosi senza cuciture, che accarezzano il palato e accompagnano durante la progressione ed un finale vivace e di egregia qualità. Un capolavoro prodotto a Montalcino in un’annata straordinaria in Toscana. Meglio dal 2022.